Tag Archives: fishing

First Couple Of Weeks At Slippery Winds Lodge.

Hi everyone, my name is James Mathias I have taken a job with Slippery Winds this summer. My position here is fishing guide/ shore hand. I have decided to write about some of the adventures that I have had already and will continue throughout the season to write about my experiences here at the lodge.

I will begin with a short story about a few day out on the water. Well, I suppose I should back it up just a bit for a moment. This season started off with a good couple of weeks of getting to know the staff here at Slippery Winds. Lori our Manager / Chef,  Elizabeth and Paulene, our waitresses and house cleaning staff, Rick our mechanic/maintenance and a bit of everything handyman, Sam, our 2nd guide and shore hand helper,  Stormy and Aaron, our helpers that came up just to help open up the lodge for the season, and of course our fearless leader himself Mr Randy Duvell. Getting to know these people over the first few weeks of the summer has been a pleasure. everyone has put in a lot of hard work to get the lodge ready for guests to come and relax on a fishing vacation they will not soon forget.

Our first guests arrived on the 19th of May. with cold-front cold wet conditions, the fishing was proving a bit tough to figure out, it wasn’t just our guests either that were finding things tough but our guides too, especially myself, I  was finding it very difficult to get even enough fish to have a decent shore lunch. On day 3, two of our guests decided to break down and hire a lodge guide I was the man for the job. I took a fantastic couple of guys from Texas out for the day. In the morning we hooked into several Largemouth and smallmouth bass and then got into a few northern pike. As the walleye decided to go to a bay we didn’t hit yet I had made the decision to keep a few of the smaller pike to keep for shore lunch. Lunch was a hit. The almost traditional Canadian shore lunch which consisted of fried tomato pork beans, canned corn, homemade hash-browns, fried onions and, well, in this case instead of walleye it was northern pike seasoned with the slippery Winds top secret seasoning and properly filleted and deep fried over an open fire in the pouring rain. Our clients seemed very happy with the day as they hooked more fish than they were expecting by days end.

   

Over the next few day’s I was on the water daily, Guiding some outstanding fellas from Wisconsin. For the first 2 days, the fishing was outstanding, hitting over 35 Bass landed and around 15 pike on both days. My clients seemed super excited when both of them on each of their trips with me while fishing for some walleye in the later part of the afternoon, had the privilege of being able to have the feeling of what it feels like to have a very large musky on the end of their lines. It was a good thing neither of them had actually landed the beastly fish as the musky are not actually in season as of yet.

On their 3rd day of guided trips, the same Wisconson clients wanted to go to a back lake to try their hand at some lake trout. I mentioned that they may wish for a 2nd guide for the back lakes as the boats on those Lakes are a bit on the small side and wanted them to be as comfortable as possible. Sammy, (our 2nd guide) was out with the group for this next adventure.  We decided to hike into a lake called Bluff Point. Bluff Point is definitely known for its lake trout fishery and the clients soon found out just how good it was.  Sammy hooked into over 10 lakers, 3 or 4 Pike and a few Bass in 2.5 hours and I had around the same number of Bass and Pike but a few less Lakers than Sammy. The competition was fierce in the morning between the 2 boats before a great packed lunch on a majestic island in the middle of the lake. After lunch, everyone had decided to pack it in to get to another lake to try our hand at some more bass fishing. I myself made up for the friendly competition loss in the morning by getting over 25 Bass in the afternoon. once again the clients seemed very happy with the result of their trip and I manage to get myself some great rest before tomorrow’s next fishing adventure.

 

I hope you have enjoyed this little story about fishing here at Slippery Winds this past week and stay tuned,  I will tell the stories of my fishing adventures here at Slippery winds throughout this 2017 season.

Ice Fishing Video

This past weekend I had the opportunity to take Filipino TV and the crew from the Canadian Fishing Network {CFN} out for a weekend of fun in the sun, well on the ice anyway.

I wanted to pack as much into our weekend as possible. Its not every day you get the opportunity to showcase what you do for a living to a large population or viewership at little to no cost. People or companies pay big $$$ to get this type of advertising for their businesses.

Sometimes its nice to just be able to kick back and relax with a few friends and not worry about catching the biggest fish. With social media widely used, fishing seems to have taken off in a crazy 180 degree hard left turn over the last few years. everyone and their dog seems to think that if you want to be considerate a fisherman these days, you need to have the latest gear, the best electronics, the highest end latest and greatest tackle, and of course if you are not sponsored by someone then you are a nobody and why even fish at all, right? Well I like to think we can still just get out and fish for a good time, maybe meet some fellow fisherman, get some people introduced to the sport, that kind of thing. So that is exactly what I had in store for CFN and Filipino TV.

I had CFN meet some of their fans up on the Moira Lake to go fishing with, we had a good old fashioned fish fry on the ice, we had multi species targeted over the 2 day weekend, we introduced youths, both males and females to the sport and they all caught their first fish through the ice, we had great food prepared on the ice by chef AJ, for lunch, and it was one of the best trips I think I’ve had on the ice in a long time.

click the link below to see the weekend show.

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009627498906&fref=ts

#LakeOntario – The Last 100 Mile Stretch

It’s amazing how quickly you can be on the top of your game and end up at a complete loss. This past week I was on route to having my best season since I started this guiding game over 3.5 years ago. Over the past 2 weeks I have been experiencing motor problems “again”. I mean lets face it, owning a boat means you are constantly doing maintenance, weather its a brand new boat or a used one, there is always something to be done. what does BOAT stand for? Break, Out, Another, Thousand.  Just over the past 2 weeks alone, first a fuel pump went down on one of my mains, then I had  spark plug cables need to be replaced, then coils, none of these items you would think are a big problem right? well in order to get these issues looked at and assessed properly each time,  you need to have a marine mechanic come out to your boat at the marina because you cant move a big boat like mine easily. Well first, everything costs 10 x the amount when your talking boats compared to cars, and then try and find a mechanic willing to come out to you is nearly impossible unless you have deep pockets.

 

After calling almost every mechanic listed on craigslist, Kijiji, Yellow pages, and online, It seems you need to have someone recommend you to the mechanic in order to get any decent service. otherwise you probably won’t have anyone come out to see you for weeks on end. Now just to have a guy show up to the boat 20 minutes away from his shop is around $150 to $250 and he hasn’t even looked at your motors yet. Needless to say after all of this you hope/pray that the mechanic that shows up is a good one. now I am sure the guy that came to my boat was a good mechanic but after everything was assessed he had to go back to his shop and order the right parts, this takes a day of 2 to get the right parts in, especially when you have motors like mine.

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So trying to save a few $$$$ I picked up the parts in a few days and went back to install them myself saving a few hours of labor and another $250 delivery fee, probably a $600 saving overall lol. Once the parts were back on the boat the boat seemed to run like a dream, so I started booking clients once again. I had a party of 4 show up to the boat, but as I headed down the channel to the open water they started sputtering and then stalled out and would not turn back on,  Now I couldn’t figure out what went wrong just that one of my mains wouldn’t start again. I had to call a buddy of mine, another guide and let him take my clients out for me.  I spent 2 days trying to figure out the problem and decided it was not worth spending the money to have the mechanic come back out again as paying for another “show up fee” would just piss me off. I made up my mind to take the boat back to my home area of Napanee in the #BayOfQuinte. The journey would be right around 100 miles on the water with 1 main engine completely down and the other was running, iffy at best.

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I started off from Bowmanville harbor on my #Yamaha  kicker motor, a small 8 horse power 4 stroke motor that I have never had an issue with in the past, very reliable, infact that motor is the only reason that I decided I would even attempt the journey at all. I started off at 4am by trolling out of the harbor. In about 10 minutes I was in 45ft of water and decided to throw out a couple lines as I have a ticket for the #GreatOntarioSalmonDerby anyway, and since I’m trolling my way along I may as well be #fishing, right?

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well it wasn’t long before I had my first hit of the day, a decent but much too small for the derby, 12lbs king salmon, as it was not big enough to weigh in I carefully released the fish because I was on a 2 day journey and the fish would spoil if I kept it. Soon after the first fish I had my second fish of the day on the line, a bit smaller than the first, so again the fish was released. then I had a massive hit on a wire dipsey line with a #SeafourLure spoon on the end of it, a little Shad sent from #LiquidMayhem to entice the bite & WHAAAAMO. The Line screamed out of the reel, my excitement level rose drastically making me forget I was even in a broken boat on a 100 mile journey. All I cared about was landing what ever was on the other end of the line. I fought the monster for approx 35 to 40 minutes before I was able to tire it out enough to be able to get my net underneath her and lift her into the boat. She was not as big as she fought but it was still a decent 20lbs plus fish anyway. When I tried to put her on the scale, my scale was reading all over the place I could not get an accurate reading which means one of 2 things. Either this fish is bigger than I think it is or the batteries in the scale need to be replaced LOL.

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The sun was now up and running low over the water. the fish I just landed may be the last of the season for me so I figured I’d better keep her and get it weighed in at #PortHope which should only be a couple hours away from my current location. In the Livewell the fish went, with some ice to keep her as fresh as I could.

By approximately 10:00am after catching & releasing 3 more smaller fish, I arrived at Port hope marina. I pulled up to the fuel pump station and was greeted by a beautiful young women working the weigh station/and fuel pumps. after fueling the boat I asked her to weigh in the fish I had kept. The fish weighed in at 25.10lbs  which was exciting as I knew being the beginning of the week that this fish would probably make the derby board, (which it did) and it stayed there until Wednesday too until I got beat off the board with a 25.84. oh well I can say I made the board for a few days anyway LOL.

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I had a quick breakfast at a nice little cafe (great breakfast by the way) right at the marina by the beach,  bought new batteries for my scale (ha ha ha) and of course had to go and see the beautiful girl at the weigh station one more time (to buy ice)  before heading back out in the big water on my journey.

There was only 1 other stop I could have made before committing to go all the way to Brighton which was only 40 miles away from Port Hope, this was Coburg #Marina but it was only 5 miles away from Port Hope Marina. the decision was either to spend the night in Coburg or try and make it to Brighton. Take into consideration that the top speed of my boat was about 3 to 5 miles an hour on my kicker motor, or 7MPH on my one main half working main motor, which would put me in Brighton around 8pm that evening, I had started the day at 4am. that is a long day to be on the water in the sun, trust me. anyway of course I decided to make my way to Brighton the wind was in my favor with west winds.

 

It seemed like forever  to get Coburg out of my sights. It made the day seem like I was making very little to no progress, and to make things worse the winds had kicked up to 25 west winds with gusts of 42km west wind. This made for some large rolling waves, maybe 6 footers at times, it was travelling in the right direction allowing me to get a bit better timing 8 miles per hour as with each passing wave the boat would almost be pushed enough to start surfing. then once the wave passed the boat would slow to 2 miles per hour. this jerking motion for hours on end mean you need to be on the ball in terms of steering or you can be turned around in a split second, constantly counter steering the boat to try and stay in a straight line. I was praying that the waves would get just a bit bigger so that I would be able to surf the boat and ride the waves to my night time destination.

 

at around 7pm I got to the point that leads into Brighton harbor as I rounded the point to head into the harbor it got very shallow. I went from 45ft of water to 5ft of water within a few meters and with the rolling waves (now white capping) that I had been riding were now big enough that the boat actually was able to do a bit of surfing only this time I was in dangerously shallow and unknown waters. Yes in case you were wondering I was getting a bit nervous LOL.

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Once I got around the point and the land blocked the wind, the water instantly became like a sheet of glass and I calmly made it into the Brighton Marina. I pulled up to the marina about 7:45pm as I needed a bit more fuel to make the rest of the journey. I had came 65 miles and was now only 35 miles from my home destination. After I fueled up, the marina told me they had no 2 stroke Oil to sell me which I needed as I pre mix my fuel.  I hoped my friend  Sean, from #PresquileBayOutfitters was around and I prayed he sold the oil I needed. His shop was just steps from the marina.  It wasn’t long before I was able to find Sean and  like he has done on several occasions in the passed he (saved my behind) again LOL. Sean has great customer service and great deals on #fishingtackle and #Kyakrentals. I recommend everyone go and see him if your in the Brighton area. here is the link   http://www.presquilebayoutfitters.com/

anyway after fueling up and a short visit with Sean I was on the water again to find a spot to tie up for the night, have some dinner, and get some sleep. I headed up the Trent canal and immediately found a good spot to tie up to, right next to a very impressive sail boat who had also decided that they had enough travel for the day. the sail boat was heading to where I had just come from 16 hours prior. They figured they would try to get to Port Darlington or Whitby by the following afternoon.

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I was up early as was the sail boat next to me, and off the pier at 6am the next morning to try and get a good head start on the day, however I was quickly brought to a halt by the first swing bridge in the canal only 1 mile from where I tied off the night before as there was no attendant to swing the bridge open until 9am that morning. I tied off again and got out to walk around only to find 3 other boats tied off on the other side of the bridge that had just missed the last turn the previous night and were forced to spend the night in the canal as well. I spoke with a few of the boaters and everyone seemed very relaxed and well rested but were just waiting for the bridge attendant to get to work. It wasn’t long and the attendant showed up for his shift the bridge was swung open and everyone was on their way to the various destinations all over the lake (and further).

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It took several hours but by about 11am I had made it from Trenton  about 18 miles to the #Belleville Bridge. Just after the bridge there were about 30 to 40 small sailboats all crossing my path in every direction, I think they had all been part of a sailing school. I tried to go around them but everywhere I went they would cut me off, now normally I would have easily been able to get out of their way but with only running one of my main  motors and going about 5 miles an hour I had no choice but to bull dog my way right through the lot of them. As soon as I made my way through There was a guy waving at me to slow down his hands in the air and I thought to my self,  what a fool, as if I’m going too fast LOL. anyway I almost came to a halt thinking he might be in trouble only to clue in that it was actually a good friend of mine Dave, out for a day of fishing on the Bay.

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Dave pulled up along side of my boat tied his boat to mine and climbed aboard for the next few miles. I was relieved to have someone on the boat to chat with but I soon realized that I was very tired and probably had a bit of heat stroke, needless to say I probably wasn’t making much sense at the time. Anyway I took some time and cooked up the last of some chicken legs I had in my cooler, put them on my BBQ to have a bit of lunch with Dave before he had to leave  climb back onto his boat to finish his day of fishing.

It didn’t seem long,  maybe a few hours after leaving Dave before I was back crossing under the Deseronto Bridge and was at my destination to meet my wife at the launch so I could get the boat hauled out and get it to my mechanics.

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Im not sure whats in store for Sea’s The Day Fishing for the rest of the season? I can only wait to hear from my mechanic about all the issues I will need to deal with. I will be back out on the water soon enough, but for now I’m just happy to be home treating my sun burn and heat stroke LOL

 

Thanks for reading about my 100 mile journey across Lake Ontario. Also feel free to leave any comments you may have below

Getting Our Kids Involved

After several years fishing The Bay Of Quinte and studying fish behavior and habitat (mostly walleye) I have come to realize that I have been so focused on trying to create a successful guiding service, that I have almost missed out on  a very important part of my children’s education. Getting MY kids involved in the fishing world. I find it can be very rewarding, not just for them but for me as well. I wanted to talk about the pro’s of getting kids involved in the fishing world and what it means.

WHAT YOU ARE ACTUALLY TEACHING YOUR KIDS WHEN FISHING TOGETHER:

1 – you are connecting your children to the out doors, creating life skills and learning about our history.

By taking your children fishing you are getting them off the couch and into the outdoors. Teaching them a basic survival technique which I personally believe, all Canadians should know, and experience, at some point in ones life. Fishing is a part of our Canadian heritage and teaching a child to fish is a very natural & rewarding activity.

2 –  you teach how to appreciate others for who they are not what they achieve

It is easy for parents to be consumed with having their child playing all the sports and joining all the clubs they can to gain a competitive edge. Yes, you do spend time with your kid in the car from one club/team to the next, and they do learn valuable skills, but I don’t believe that this is quality time spent together. As a parent, you still need the one on one time with your kids, and that doesn’t mean cheering at them from the side lines, it means connectivity, 1 on 1. Giving undivided attention while waiting for that fish to bite or walking the shore, side by side, which lets your child know they didn’t have to win the game for you to be invested in them.

 

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3-      Fishing teaches co-ordination, safety, decision making skills, and much more .

Each day is different than the last, offering a new lesson. Learning together to read weather conditions, habitat, water conditions, opens up great discussions bout lure and line selection.  Hand and eye co-ordination is strengthened when precision casting, you can visually see your improvement each time you get closer to the target you actually aimed for.  Knot tying is a wonderful skill for co-ordination and life in general. Water safety is a given, but also learning how to work safely with sharp objects.  Safety in the wilderness is a lesson that can be geared differently to different age groups. The more you and your child do all of this together the better you will become as anglers and the stronger your bond will become with your children.

4-       Teaching conservation

Teaching the importance of conservation is an imperative part of the entire fishing experience. On a basic level it is a great introduction to why society has structure, but more importantly it shows how our actions today have reactions in the future.

Teaching proper water, boat ramp, and shore fishing safety & etiquette are just as important as teaching habitat protection, waste disposal, and proper techniques on CPR (catch Photo, Release). It would be naive to think that fishing & boating does not have its impacts on its environment. I encourage everyone to take a visit to the following links so we are teaching our kids etiquette and conservation and have the answers to the questions they may come up with.

Proper handling of fish (OFAH standards) http://www.ontarioanglerawards.com/Hold.cfm

For musky check on Facebook and type in this URL https://www.facebook.com/PeteMaina/videos/10156984287405627/

Boating Etiquette and safety practices                                    http://realmuskoka.com/muskoka-steamships/boating-etiquette-and-best-practices-before-you-set-sail/

A few do’s and do-not’s to start with http://1source.basspro.com/index.php/component/k2/237-fishing-info/1120-6-dos-and-donts-of-fishing-etiquette

Also, remember when river fishing, if its busy around you, don’t cast over someone’s line. If someone else hooks into a fish reel up to avoid tangles and arguments.

4-  Patience

If you are introducing a youngster to the world of fishing then remember children have little patience and get board easily. So try not to over do it because YOU may want to continue fishing. If you make children fish for longer than they want to, they will loose interest quickly and will not want to go again. In our family we have two terms ‘daddy fishing’ and ‘family fishing’.  Daddy fishing equates to more then eight hours, family fishing usually tops out at three hours. You may be a patient angler but remember this skill when it comes to the children. If you are patient with them at the start, then you will have a fishing partner for life.

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If this venture sounds like it is for you and your kids, remember you do not have to spend a fortune.  It is about the time shared and the relationship you are creating. You can start at the dollar store to get your kid a little tackle box, and move to your local Canadian Tire to pick up an inexpensive rod and reel combo.  I do advise you pick up new line, as the one that is often spooled on the reel is poor quality and not worth the headache (you will also then know what is on it). Pick up some basic lures, hooks, bobbers, and sinkers and a fishing licence. Garage sales are great this time of year for cheap finds. You can minimize your purchases if you do your homework and know what type of fish is your local area.  Feel free to message me on lure ideas for specific species if you don’t know where to begin.  If you were to buy two set ups, all new, you will be investing about $80 – $150.  Then all you need to do is drive or walk to a lake nearby, walk the bank, cast a line, and watch the smiles roll in 🙂

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If you have any comments of feed back about my blog please go ahead and comment below.

Video of some my May fishing trips

So you think you want to be a fishing guide? eh!

It has now been over 3 years and now into my 4th, since I made the decision to become a full time fishing guide in the Quinte region. Truth be told when I had made this decision I really had no idea what I was in for, and probably still don’t. each year has been a crazy learning curve. I am writing this blog because of the amount of people that have said to me that he/she, either would like to be, or maybe knows someone  that they think would make an amazing fishing guide. So I’m going to put into perspective what being a guide is really like and what to expect.

Being a fishing guide can be one of the best jobs in the world its true, but it does not come easy and without blood, sweat, and tears, oh and unless you have a tonne of money in the bank, then be prepared to be financially strapped for years to come. If you love fishing, then do not become a guide. Over the past 4 years and over 400 days spent on the water, I think I can count on 1 hand how many times I have actually gone fishing, TRUE FISHING, meaning where I get to go out and enjoy the act of fishing for myself and not worry about other peoples comfort levels while on the water.

Guiding is one of the hardest industry’s I have ever been involved in, but it sure beats flipping burgers, or a busy city commute, or cutting lawns. If I had thought about it, I would have started guiding a lot earlier, maybe when I was in high school or shortly there after. The key is to begin laying the foundation at an early age by working hard to become the best fisherman you can be, by learning everything you can about fishing tactics,  techniques, and by studying the biology and behavior of the species that you want to fish for. This is difficult to narrow down at an early age I know, In fact I’m not sure I really know if I have found the right species for me yet and I’m almost 40.

Now for the part I say to people that think they want to become a guide LOL. Most people that want to get into guiding, fail to realize that “guiding” does not mean “fishing”.I have a buddy who has a son, he takes his son fishing all the time, and because I am a guide, he always say’s to me when I ask him what he’s doing for the weekend? he reply’s that he will be “guiding” his son on the bay for the weekend. Im not sure if he says this to get under my skin, or if he does it because he is trying to relate to me with what I do for a living but either way it definitely gets to me when he calls himself a guide, and over the years now has even hurt our friendship a bit. In my mind you have to earn that title.

When you take a paying customer out on the water, you are expected to be an instructor, a cheerleader, a helping hand, a butler, a maid, a cook, have incredible customer service skills, and in some cases be a babysitter. The worst case scenario requires you to choose a lure, tie the correct knots, teach the clients how to use the equipment, show the client where the fish are, choose the correct speed, and steer the boat, and then stand there and watch while the client proceeds to do everything wrong after a fish bites, usually the client, after loosing the fish due to too much slack in the line looks at you and blames you for not teaching him the correct way. You then have to nod and bow your head as if it were your fault and try all over again.

Before all of this goes on, you are required by law to take separate courses that allow you to take paying clientele on your vessel plus hold the proper insurances all of which are extremely costly, and all before you have any clientele or income into the business to help recoup your costs.

Now that you have done all that and you are trying to find any way possible to advertise your business for free because you have just spent your life savings, your wife’s life savings, the down payment you had for a house,  begged, borrowed, and stolen tens of thousands to get a suitable boat and equipment to accommodate strangers, oops I meant clients to go fishing you are all set right? NOPE WRONG.

This is the most difficult part of being a successful guide. Earning the respect of your peers. This is possibly the most important portion of becoming a successful guide. Just because you can put a few fish in your boat does not make you a good guide. If you do not have the respect of the other guides in the area that you fish in you will not last long.

Lets think about that. Especially if you are anything like me LOL. Ok lets say  you get everything in place and you come to a marina and plunk your boat in the water and your ready to start taking on clients, where are your clients coming from? now you need to go and find fish, so you ask one of the other boats your tied right next to and say hey brother so where are the fish biting today? do you think his answer is going to be “? hey new guy, ya the fish were on fire at these co-ordinates xxxyyyzzz”. NO NOT A CHANCE. it will be more like this if he doesn’t just tell you F off, “hey new guy ya we caught lots about 15 miles just west of the red marker out by ZZZXXXYYY”.  now excited you just got up to date information and thinking  wow  what a great guy. you will get up early in the morning have the gear all ready to go, your clients meet you, and you head out to what you think is going to be the best fishing grounds in the area. wondering why you are the only boat out on the water that day, you fish hard all day and nothing to show for it. you head home with your head held low with angry clients that you know will never come back. not to mention you would like to give them the trip for free but the cost of fuel to get to the spot and back and troll around all day almost broke the bank, so you have no choice but to charge the clients you just skunked.

back at the dock you talk to buddy that gave you the co-ordinates and again if he doesn’t just tell you to f-off he probably tells you “oh sorry man I heard first thing that the bite was hot somewhere else so he went there instead”. this kind of thing will probably go on for anywhere from 1 to 5 years before guys will start sharing info but you will have to earn their respect first.

While this 1 to 5 years of initiation from your peers is going on you have everyone and their dog that fishes and knows you, wanting to come out for a fishing day. when you mention the cost they look at you, laugh, and say “ok but how much for  me?” LOL thinking you need to find places where the fish are you take people out for next to nothing barely covering costs and definitely not making any kind of a wage.

within the first year, “guiding” has now become more about taking a lot of friends out for a next to free day on the water and because you are a so called “guide”  you no longer get to actually reel in any of the fish, you get to watch people learn your spots that you have worked like a dog to acquire and they get to reel in fish that you basically caught for them.

fishing that was once a passion will become a job like any other, where you have to wake up earlier than any job you’ve had in the past, around 4am, any, and every day of the week, and get home late, with what seems like very little reward. This will go on for a while, but if you can get past that time of becoming a guide to the part where you earn the respect of some of your peers, (remember you do not need the respect of ALL of them) then you will start to have fun with the job and it will eventually become the best job in the world.

remember that without the respect of your peers you truly fish alone. even though you are on your own on your boat, make all the daily decisions alone, are solely responsible for all the bills, do the clean up daily all alone, you can not do this job, WELL, alone. I can personally tell you that it is considerably easier to get onto active fish with many boats covering areas and sharing info than to have to find it on your own.

If I were to give anyone looking at becoming a Fishing guide some gentle advise it would be to, 1- remember to take advice from any guide willing to give it. 2- even if some of the information you get from someone turns out to be bogus, make sure you thank them and learn from the experience. 3- you will not like all the advice you get from people so remember to pick and choose advice that pertains to you and even if you did not like what someone has to say does not mean they are wrong. 4- this business is not for everyone and it is ok if its not for you. 5- make sure you have your own & informative good information to share with others, nothing earns respect faster than this, (a good hot lure, or spot) but be selective to who you give it to remember you have worked hard to gain this intel. 6- And lastly, remember your boat doesn’t run on thank you’s, it runs on fuel.

Now for the good part. I know I may have come across a bit sour in this blog up to now but it is the truth about becoming a guide in my eyes. Ok, moving on, so you have got through the initial initiation stage and you have found a small clientele base after a couple years spent grinding it out on the water and your still here. you have made a few alliances on the water, and you know a few good producing spots where you know you can put a few fish on the boat for clients. it is at this point you will start to enjoy your new profession. Even though you started this job thinking you could do it because you were an ok fisherman, now you realize that your potential is limitless  with the right people behind you. watching people catch fish, becomes your passion, the smiles and excitement on especially the little childrens faces that you helped put their biggest fish they have ever seen or caught is what drives you to get up every day. You start to take in the beauty and nature that surrounds you day in and day out, that you remember was one of the reasons you wanted to be a guide in the first place. a sense of relaxation consumes you every day while on the water with clients instead of a kind of stress that no individual should ever have to feel, your dream that became a job is now becoming your dream job once again, and it all becomes worth it as you truly make the transition from a passionate fisherman to “GUIDE”. Just because someone has a registered business name and a boat with the proper paper work does not make someone a “guide” it takes time to earn that title, but once you do, then no-one can take it away from you.

So if you think being a “guide” is for you, I would welcome anyone to the challenge and good luck.

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